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Catholic Baptismal and Confirmation Names


 

Catholic Baptismal and Confirmation Names

Compiled from

(1) Missale Romanum
1943 Edition - Benziger Brothers
Approbationis, +  A. Card. Vico, July 25, 1920
Litteras, +  Francis Joseph, Archbishop of New York, Holy Thursday, 1943

and

(2)  Pictorial Lives of the Saints
Benziger Brothers
Compiled from
“Butler’s Lives” and Other Approved Sources
Imprimatur, +  Michael Augustine, Archbishop of New York, January 21, 1887


Introduction

The Names of Saints

Names, CHRISTIAN, names given to individuals at their Baptism.  One of the duties of pastors in regard to Baptism is the exercise of care, in order that a Christian name be given to the one Baptized.  This accords with a venerable Catholic custom always insisted upon by the Church, and now reaffirmed as a law in the new Code of Canon Law.  The Roman Ritual and Roman Catechism warn against the choice of ‘obscene, fabulous, or ridiculous names’ and ‘names of vain deities or of impious pagans’. The names of the Saints are to be to the Baptized who bear them, sources of imitation, protection, and intercession”  (Conde B. Pallen, Ph.D., LL.D., John J. Wynne, S.J., S.T.D., et alii, THE NEW CATHOLIC DICTIONARY, 1929, Imprimatur, Patrick Cardinal Hayes, Tuesday, October 1, 1929, “Names, CHRISTIAN”, p.  661-a; emphasis added.).

“Finally, a name is given the person Baptized. It should be taken from some person whose eminent Sanctity has given him [her] a place in the catalogue of the Saints.   The similarity of name will stimulate each one to imitate the Virtues and holiness of the Saint, and, moreover, to hope and pray that he who is the model for his [her] imitation will also be his [her] advocate and watch over the safety of his [her] body and soul.”

Wherefore those are to be reproved who search for the names of heathens [pagans], especially of those who were the greatest monsters of iniquity, to bestow upon their children. By such conduct they practically prove how little they regard Christian piety when they so fondly cherish the memory of impious men, as to wish to have their profane names continually echo in the ears of the Faithful” (“The Roman Catechism” - “The Catechism of the Council of Trent for Parish Priests”, by Pope Saint Pius V, issued in July, 1566, translated from the original Latin by Father by John A. McHugh, O.P. and by Father Charles J. Callan, O.P., The Sacrament of Baptism, The Name Given In Baptism).

“Pastors should see to it that a Christian name is given to all whom they Baptize.”  (Codex Iuris Canonici, Code of Canon Law, issued on May 27, 1917; effective date May 19, 1918; Canon 761).

The Church has always insisted [35] upon this pious custom, and Priests must now obey the law and may no longer be accused of ‘cranky notions’ when they do so. The name of his Patron Saint should remind the faithful Catholic of the example he is to imitate and of the protection he may expect through the intercession of the Patron. [36]”


Footnotes:


[35]  Clement XII, “Compertum”, Aug. 24, 1734, ad II, dub.; Benedict XIV, “Inter omnigenas”; Feb. 2, 1744, § 3. Pagan names are to be excluded entirely.

[36] S. C. Sacr., March 13, 1910; ad 9, n. I (A. Ap. S., II, 195).

(Rev. P. Charles Augustine Bachofen, O.S.B., D.D., Professor of Canon Law, “A Commentary on the New Code of Canon Law”, Volume 4, The New Code of Canon Law, Book III, Ecclesiastical Things, Part I, The Sacraments, Title I, Baptism, Chapter III, Rites and Ceremonies of Baptism, Canon 761, p. 74.  Imprimatur, Sti. Ludovici, die 12. Martii, 1920. +  Joannes J. Glennon, Archiepiscopus, Sti. Ludomci.)



“24.  It is, moreover, Our will that Catholics should abstain from certain appellations which have recently been brought into use to distinguish one group of Catholics from another. They are to be avoided not only as ‘profane novelties of words,’ (1 Timothy 6:20) out of harmony with both truth and justice, but also because they give rise to great trouble and confusion among Catholics. Such is the nature of Catholicism that it does not admit of more or less, but must be held as a whole or as a whole rejected: ‘This is the Catholic faith, which unless a man believe faithfully and firmly; he cannot be saved’ (Athanasian Creed). There is no need of adding any qualifying terms to the profession of Catholicism: it is quite enough for each one to proclaim ‘Christian is my name, Catholic is my surname,’ (Bishop Saint Pacian [b. c. 310  A.D. - d. 390 A.D.], Father of the Catholic Church, Bishop of Barcelona, Spain [360 A.D. - 390 A.D.], Epistola I, Contra Sympronianum, De Catholico Nomine, ¶ 7, Letter I, Against Sympronian, a.k.a. Sympronianus, On the Catholic Name, ¶ 7 [375 A.D.]; De Scriptoribus Ecclesiasticis.) only let him endeavour to be in reality what he calls himself.”  (Pope Benedict XV, Giacomo Della Chiesa [Thursday, September 3, 1914 - Saturday, January 21, 1922], Encyclical “Ad Beatissimi Apostolorum”, Sunday, November 1, 1914, ¶ 24.).

“7.  Many things the Holy Spirit hath taught us, Whom God sent from Heaven to the Apostles as their Comforter and Guide. Many things reason teaches us, as Paul saith, and honesty, and, as he says, nature itself. (1 Corinthians 11:14)....  [But] shall the Fathers rather follow our authority, and the antiquity of Saints give way to be emended by us, and times now putrifying through their sins, pluck out the grey hairs of the Apostolic Age? And yet, my brother, be not troubled; Christian is my name, Catholic is my surname. [Christianus mihi nomen est, Catholicus cognomen.] The former [Christian] qualifies me, while the latter [Catholic] proclaims me for what I am. The latter [Catholic] demonstrates what the former [Christian] signifies.”   (Bishop Saint Pacian [b. c. 310  A.D. - d. 390 A.D.], Father of the Catholic Church, Bishop of Barcelona, Spain [360 A.D. - 390 A.D.], Epistola I, Contra Sympronianum, De Catholico Nomine, ¶ 7 and ¶ 8.  Letter I, Against Sympronian, a.k.a. Sympronianus, On the Catholic Name, ¶ 7. [375 A.D.]; De Scriptoribus Ecclesiasticis.)

This also makes it clear that, historically, the only Christians are Catholics!, i.e.  Christian Catholic is the correct historical term only of Catholics.

Why Are Laws Necessary?

All laws are based, either directly or indirectly, on the explicit Laws of God - the Ten Commandments - and on the implicit Laws of God - what theologians call the Natural Law.  An example which is easy to understand is the Law of Gravity.

Without Laws, there would be chaos; with Laws there is good order and everyone knows their duties and responsibilities.  Consider what traffic would be like if there were no laws, no rules of the road, as some States call them.  With laws, there should be harmony, balance, fairness, justice, equality, etc.  This is why the false philosophy that God is not in the punishment business, which is too often heard from the very people who should be educating the Laity and enforcing God's Laws and the Laws of the Catholic Church, is absurd, ridiculous, and demonic, not to mention a vain and foolish attempt to re-write the Bible.  If it feels good, do it, is the lie of Lucifer to gorge Hell with damned Souls.  This type of ecclesiastical negligence and malfeasance quickly identifies those who are Modernist Heretics and/or their comrades in crime, the NEW Theology Heretics.

Consider how a busy Mother, preparing dinner, cooking a number of food items in various pots and pans on a gas stove, sees her young child stretching forth a hand to touch the pretty blue gas flame with one or more fingers, instantly reacts to protect her child from the serious consequences of such an act.  The Mother then usually scolds the child, or administers some light-handed corporal punishment to help the child to remember not to do this in the future.  The child, however, cries, because the Mother has deprived the child of the freedom to do whatever the child wants to do - according to the false philosophy of pagan secular humanism, while the Mother could be arrested and put in jail for child abuse!

So this helps to explain why the Roman Catholic Church has its laws, called Canon Law, in order to maintain good order, and to help to prevent, in extreme cases, a Soul from possibly going to Hell.  Anarchy - lack of proper discipline and order - is the law of the Devil in order to reap abundant harvests for Hell.

Just as famous sports stars, movie stars, TV stars, etc. are chosen by some people, especially children and teenagers, as a person they choose to emulate - to imitate - whether in the style of clothes they wear, and/or how they act or react in their public/private life, etc., so also the Catholic Church has its own “stars” - called “Saints” - which she presents to her Faithful for emulation, for imitation, not in terms of what they wore, but rather how they overcame problems in their own daily lives.

The living of a real Spiritual Life, including a Life of Prayer, a Life of the exercise of the Virtues and of the Seven Gifts, is the “road map”, so to speak, which the Catholic Church offers to her members as a sure and certain way of how to get to Heaven!

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!”

By trying to do the best you can, by the Grace of God, to imitate your Patron Saint(s) in the living of your daily life, which includes picking up the cross the good God gives you to carry each day of your life, following in the footsteps of Jesus Christ Who did not throw away His cross, Who never complained about His cross, but Who accepted His cross, embraced His cross, and Who faithfully carried His cross as an example, and as a role model, to those Holy Saints who came before us!

They imitated Christ by finding ways that helped each one of them to carry their own cross faithfully every day.  In so doing, they made a virtual road-map to Heaven that, realistically, you can follow.  It worked for them and so it can work for you!  Their road-maps are not broken, so don’t fix them!

Some of the more famous Spiritual “road-maps” are called “Schools of Spirituality” and include the Dominicans, Jesuits, Carmelites, Benedictines, Franciscans, etc. The ultimate goal of each of these Schools is the same - Heaven.  But there are many different Spiritual paths to Heaven.  Some people prefer to focus more on praying, whether meditation or formal prayers, e.g. the Holy Rosary - which should be a basic for everyone.  Others prefer a more active life-style such as teaching, counseling, etc.

For example, Saint Theresa of the Child Jesus had her “little way” which helped her get to Heaven!  By the Grace of God, she did the best she could every day because she loved God and she became one of God’s favorites by practicing works of supererogation - doing little things you are not required to do out of the love of God.

This is why your Patron Saints are important to you!  Plus, they can also help you when you need help.  The Saints were ordinary people who did ordinary things for the love of God and thus they did these ordinary things extraordinarily well!

Regarding the Names of Patron Saints, please keep in mind that neither of the two Names of the Patron Saints chosen for the Baptismal Names (first name and middle name) can be used for the Name of the Patron Saint chosen for the Confirmation Name.

It should be obvious that a complete list of the Names of all of the Holy Angels and Saints in Heaven are impossible to know because most of them do not have a special feast day.  Thus the reason for the Feast Day of All Saints, November 1, each year - so that all of the Saints in Heaven can have a special Feast Day.

However, lists of some of the names of the Holy Saints in Heaven can be compiled from various sources, such as the Missale Romanum which has special Feast Days for some Holy Saints in its Liturgical Calendar and which Feast Days compose part of the Propers of the Mass and from various other sources which give the names of Saints, and sometimes a brief biography of each Saint.

Also please keep in mind that the spelling of the Names of Saints can and does vary from country to country, culture to culture.  In addition, some Female Names of Saints are adapted from various Male Names of Saints, e.g. Augustina from Augustine.

In the Partial List of Roman Catholic Saints for use for Baptismal and Confirmation Names, although this list is not complete, nevertheless, it does contain the names of those ordinary people - like you - who made it to Heaven.  This list gives the names that are primarily recommend for Baptism and Confirmation.

Pray to God the Holy Ghost for guidance as to which Name(s) below to choose, whether for Baptism and/or Confirmation, whether for yourself, if you are a convert, and/or for your child/children.

Prayer to God the Holy Ghost


Veni, Sancte Spiritus
Come, O Holy Ghost

Come, O Holy Ghost, fill the hearts of Thy faithful and kindle in them the fire of Thy love.

V. Send forth Thy Spirit, and they shall be created;
R. And Thou shalt renew the face of the earth.

Let us pray

O God, who didst instruct the hearts of Thy faithful by the light of Thy Holy Spirit, grant us in the same Spirit to relish what is right and ever to rejoice in His consolation. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.
 

God Bless You and may the Holy Saint(s) you choose as the Patron Saint(s), whether for yourself , and/or for your child/children, always help you every day of your life!
 

MALE SAINTS

A.

Adalard
Adjutor
Adrian
Agapitus
Albert
Albertus
Alexander
Alexius
Aloysius
Alphonsus
Amand
Ambrose
Anacletus
Anastasius
Andrew
Andronicus
Anselm
Anthony
Antoninus
Antony
Apollinaris
Arnold
Arnuf
Arnulph
Athanasius
Augustine
Aureliatus

B.

Barnabas
Bartholomew
Basil
Bede
Benedict
Bénézet
Benjamin
Benno
Bernard
Bernardine
Bernward
Blaise
Bonaventure
Boniface
Brendan
Bruno

C.

Caius
Cajetan
Callistus
Camillus
Casimir
Cassian
Celestine
Celsus
Charles
Christopher
Chrysanthus
Claude
Clement
Cletus
Cloud
Columbanus
Cornelius
Cosmas
Crispin
Crispinian
Cuthbert
Cuthman
Cyprian
Cyriacus
Cyril

D.

Damasus
Damian
David
Didacus
Dionysius
Dismas
Dominic
Drogo
Dunstan

E.

Edmund
Edward
Eligius
Elmo
Encratis
Ephrem
Erasmus
Eugenius
Eusebius
Eustachius
Evaristus

F.

Fabian
Faustinus
Felix
Ferdinand
Fiacre
Fidelis
Flavian
Florian
Foillan
Francis
Fulgentius

G.

Gabriel
Gangulphus
Geaesius
Genesius
George
Gerard
Gerard
Germanus
Gervase
Giles
Gorgonius
Gottschalk
Gregory
Gummarus

H.

Hadrian
Hegesippus
Henry
Herman
Hervé
Hilarion
Hippolytus
Holos
Homobonus
Honoratus
Honorius
Hormisdas
Hubert
Hubertus
Hugh
Hyacinth

I.

Ignatius
Innocent
Irenaeus
Isaac
Isidore
Ives

J.

James
James Mary
Januarius
Jerome
Joachim
John
John Marie
Josaphat
Joseph
Jude
Julian
Julius
Justin

K.
 
 

L.

Lambert
Laurence
Leo
Leodegar
Leonard
Linus
Louis
Lucian
Luke

M.

Magnus
Malachi
Marcel
Marcellin
Marcellinus
Marcellus
Marcus
Mark
Martin
Matthew
Matthias
Maturinus
Maurice
Maurus
Maximus
Methodius
Michael
Modestus

N.

Narcissus
Nazarius
Nicholas
Norbert

O.

Odo
Olaf

P.

Pachomius
Palladius
Pamphilus
Pancratius
Pantaleon
Paphnutius
Paschal
Patrick
Paul
Paulinus
Peter
Philip
Pius
Placidus
Polycarp
Protase
Pucisus

Q.

Quintin

R.

Raphael
Raymond
Reinold
Remigius
Rene
Richard
Robert
Roch
Romanus

S.

Sebastian
Severus
Silverius
Simeon
Simon
Simplicius
Stanislas
Stephen
Sylvester
Symphorian

T.

Tarasius
Tarcisius
Thaddeus
Theobald
Theodore
Theodoret
Theodosius
Thomas
Tiburtius
Timothy
Titus
Tryphon

U.

Urban

V.

Valentine
Venantius
Venerius
Viator
Victor
Victorian
Vincent
Vitus

W.

Walstan
Wenceslas
Wilfrid
William
Willibrord
Winefride
Winnoc
Wolbodo

X.

Xavier
Xystus

Y.

Yves
Yvo

Z.

Zachary
Zeno
Zephyrinus


 

.
FEMALE SAINTS

A.

Acca
Agatha
Agnes
Anastasia
Angela
Anne
Appolonia
Augustina

B.

Barbara
Basilissa
Bernadette
Bertha
Bibiana
Bona
Bridget
Brigid
Brigit
Bulalia

C.

Camillas
Catherine
Cecilia
Christina
Clare
Clotilda
Colette
Columba
Crescentia
Cunegunda

D.

Daria
Dionysia
Domitilla
Dorothea
Dorothy
Dymphna

E.

Elizabeth
Emiliana
Eulalia

F.

Felicitas
Frances

G.

Gemma
Genevieve
Germaine
Gertrude
Grace

H.

Hedwig
Helena
Hilary
Hunna

I.

Imelda

J.

Jadwiga
Jane
Jane Frances
Joan
Jovita
Julia
Juliana
Justa
Justina

K.

Katherine

L.

Lidwina
Lucy
Ludmilla
Lydia

M.

Marcella
Margaret
Margaret Mary
Martha
Martina
Mary
Mary Magdalen
Maud
Monica

N.

Notburga

O.

Odilia
Olympias

P.

Perpetua
Petronilla
Praxedes
Prisca

Q.

R.

Regina
Rene
Rita
Rosalia
Rose
Rufina

S.

Scholastica
Seraphia
Solange
Susanna

T.

Tarasia
Tatiana
Teresa
Tharasius
Thecla
Thérèse
Thrasilla

U.

Ursula

V.

Valery
Veronica

Z.

Zita
 

More Saints Names

IF you would like to have more choices for names, you should refer to the official Roman Catholic catalog of Saints entitled The Roman Martyrology, which was published in English translation, from the original Latin, in 1916.  Beginning on page 405 through page 462, in alphabetical sequence, there are thousands of names of Holy Saints of the Roman Catholic Church!

Their Feast Days are also given.  Please note that although there are names of many Martyrs to be found in this alphbetical list, there are also names of many other Saints who are not Martyrs.  "M" identifies those who are Martyrs.  Others are identified variously, e.g. "C" means a Confessor for the Faith; etc.

IF you want to know more above a certain Saint, simply go to the page of the book for that particular day of the year.

You can have this book for free!  Here is the URL at which you can choose which file format to download to your computer.

https://archive.org/details/romanmartyrology00cathuoft


IF you prefer the pdf file format, which is highly recommended because it is the most accurate format, here is the URL:

https://ia600208.us.archive.org/4/items/romanmartyrology00cathuoft/romanmartyrology00cathuoft.pdf


.

Patron Saints of Some Vocations and Occupations

Alphabetical by Name of Saint

A.

Adrian of Nicomedia - arms dealers, butchers, guards, soldiers
Agatha - nurses, bellmaking
Albert the Great - teacher, natural scientists
Alexander of Comana - charcoal-burners
Alexius - nurses
Aloysius Gonzaga - Children, Catholic Students, Jesuit Scholastics
Amand - bartenders, boy scouts, brewers, innkeepers, merchants, vine growers, vintners
Ambrose of Milan - bee keepers, wax-melters and refiners
Anastasius the Fuller - fullers, weavers
Andrew the Apostle - fishmongers, fishermen
Anne - equestrians, stablemen, French-Canadian voyageurs, Cabinet makers, homemakers
Ansovinus - gardeners
Anthony Mary Claret - weavers
Anthony the Abbot - basket-makers, gravediggers
Anthony the Great - swineherds, motorists
Anthony of Padua - travelers, brush makers
Antipas - dentists
Apollonia - dentists
Arnold of Soissons - brewers
Arnulph - millers
Augustine of Hippo - brewers, printers, and theologians

B.

Barbara - architects, builders and miners, artillerymen, foundry workers, fireworks makers, geoscientists, stonemasons
Bartholomew the Apostle - tanners, leatherworkers, curriers, plasterers
Basil the Great - hospital administrators
Benedict of Nursia - farmers, farmhands, husbandry
Bénézet - bridge-builders
Benno - fishermen
Bernadette of Lourdes - shepherds, shepherdesses
Bernardine of Siena - Advertisers
Bernard of Clairvaux - bee keepers, wax melters and refiners
Bernard of Menthon - mountaineers, skiers
Bernard of Vienne - farmers, farmhands, husbandry
Bernward of Hildesheim - architects
Blaise - veterinarians, wool combers, town criers and weavers
Bona of Pisa - travelers, specifically couriers, guides, pilgrims, flight attendants
Botulph - farmers, farmhands, husbandry
Brendan the Navigator - mariners, seafarers, sailors, those traveling by sea
Brigid of Ireland - dairy workers, healers

C.

Cajetan - unemployed, gamblers, odd lot dealers, and of job seekers.
Camillus of Lellis - hospital workers, nurses
Cassian of Imola - schoolteachers, shorthand writers, parish clerks
Catherine - philosophers, preachers
Catherine of Alexandria - tanners, librarians[3], nurses
Catherine of Siena - nurses
Cecilia - musicians
Charles Borromeo and Robert Bellarmine - Catechists
Christina the Astonishing - millers, psychiatrists
Christopher - travelers, surfers, athletes, drivers, pilots
Clare of Assisi - goldsmiths, gilders, laundry workers, needleworkers
Claude - sculptors
Clement - stonecutters
Columbanus - motorcyclists
Cosmas - doctors, pharmacists, surgeons, barbers
Germaine Cousin - shepherdesses
Crispin - tanners, shoemakers, cobblers, leatherworkers, curriers, saddle-makers
Cuthbert - shepherds
Cuthman - shepherds

D.

Damian - doctors, pharmacists, surgeons
Dismas - undertakers, thieves
Dominic - astronomers, astronomy, scientists
Dominic de la Calzada - civil engineers
Dominic of Silos - shepherds
Dorothea of Caesarea - horticulture, florists, brewers
Drogo - shepherds, coffee house keepers, coffee house owners
Dunstan - blacksmiths, goldsmiths
Dunstan and Venerius the Hermit - lighthouse keepers
Dymphna - mental health professionals, therapists

E.

Edward the Confessor - kings
Eligius - veterinarians, coin collectors, farriers, farmers, farmhands, husbandry, harness makers, goldsmiths, jewelers, Royal Electrical Mechanical Engineers Soldiers, numismatists
Elisabeth of Hungary - nursing services, bakers
Erasmus of Formiae or Elmo - pyrotechnicians, steeplejacks, chimney sweeps, sailors and anyone who works at great heights
Ephrem the Syrian - spiritual directors and spiritual leaders
Eustachius - hunters, firefighters, trappers

F.

Ferdinand III - engineers
Fiacre - taxi-drivers, horticulturists, gardeners
Florian - firefighters, chimney sweeps
Foillan - dentists, surgeons, truss-makers, children's nurses
Frances of Rome - automobile drivers
Francis DeSales - writers/authors, journalists
Francis of Assisi - animal welfare and rights workers
Francis Xavier - Catholic Missionaries

G.

Gabriel - communications workers, postal workers, emergency dispatchers, Police Dispatchers, broadcasters, messengers, and radio workers
Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows - students, seminarians, clerics, a society exists whose goal is to have Gabriel declared the patron saint of handgunners
Gang Bing - eunuchs[4][5]
Gangulphus - tanners, shoemakers
Gemma Galgani - students, pharmacists
Genesius - actors, comedians, clowns, dancers, theatrical performers of all kinds, also attorneys, barristers, lawyers
George - agricultural workers, archers, armourers, boy scouts, butchers, cavalry, Crusaders, equestrians, farmhands, farmers, field hands, field workers, horsemen, husbandry, husbandmen, knights, riders, Rover Scouts, saddle makers, saddlers, scouts, shepherds, soldiers, Teutonic Knights, (Policemen and firefighters in Brazil).
Giles - beggars
Gregory the Great - teachers
Gottschalk - linguists, princes, translators
Gummarus - lumberjacks
Rene Goupil - anesthesiologists

H.

Hervé - bards, musicians
Saint Holos - Medical professions / Faith healing
Homobonus - businessmen, tailors, and clothworkers
Honorius of Amiens (Honoratus) - bakers, confectioners, bakers of holy wafers, candle-makers, florists, flour merchants, oil refiners, and pastry chefs
Hubertus - hunters, furriers
Hunna - laundresses, laundry workers, washerwomen

I.

Isidore the Farmer - farmers, farmhands, husbandry, manual laborers
Isidore of Seville - computer scientists, computer programmers, computer technicians, computer users, schoolchildren, students

J.

Jadwiga of Poland - queens
James, son of Zebedee - veterinarians, equestrians, furriers, tanners, pharmacists
James, son of Alphaeus - pharmacists
Jerome - librarians[6], translators, spectacle makers
Joan of Arc - Girl Guides and Girl Scouts, soldiers
John the Almoner - Knights Hospitaller
John the Apostle - tanners
John the Baptist - farriers, bird dealers, Knights Hospitaller, Freemasons
John of Damascus - makers of images of the crucifix
John the Evangelist - Freemasons
John of God - hospital workers, nurses, booksellers
John Baptist de la Salle - teachers of youth
John Bosco - apprentices, editors, printers/publishers
John Gualbert - foresters
John Vianney - priests
Joseph - cabinetmakers, carpenters, craftsmen, laborers, workers
Joseph of Arimathea - funeral directors, tinsmiths
Joseph of Cupertino - air travelers, aviators, astronauts, pilots
Joshua - Intelligence Professionals
John of Capistrano - jurists
Jude Thaddeus - difficult and impossible cases
Julian the Hospitaller - shepherds, boatmen
Justa and Rufina - potters

K.

L.

Lawrence - librarians, tanners, cooks (having been martyred by roasting alive on a gridiron), Comedians.
Leodegar - millers
Lidwina - skaters
Luke the Evangelist - doctors, surgeons, artists, painters, Notaries

M.

Marcellin Champagnat - education and teachers
Margaret of Antioch - nurses
Martha - dieticians, cooks
Mary Magdalene - tanners, hairdressers, pharmacists, repentant sinners, Apostle to the Apostles
Magnus of Avignon - fish dealers, fishmongers
Albertus Magnus - chemists, medical technicians
Macarius of Unzha, Venerable - craftsmen, merchants, travelers (in Russian Orthodox Church[9])
Malo - pig-keepers
Martin de Porres - Hairdressers
Martin of Tours - soldiers
Matthew - accountants, tax collectors, bankers, bookkeepers, custom agents, security guards, perfumers,
Maturinus - comic actors, jesters, and clowns, as well as the patron saint of sailors (in Brittany) of tinmen (in Paris)[10] and of plumbers.[11]
Maurice and Lydia - dyers
Maurice - infantrymen
Michael the Archangel - radiologists, soldiers, paramedics, paratroopers, police officers, grocers, supermarket workers, stevedores, longshoremen

N.

Nicholas of Myra - sailors, fishermen, merchants, thieves[citation needed], prostitutes[citation needed], pharmacists, archers, pawnbrokers
Nicholas of Tolentine - mariners
Notburga - farmers, farmhands, husbandry

O.

Our Lady of Loreto - Aviators
 
 

P.

Pantaleon - doctors
Patrick - engineers
Paul the Apostle - hospital public relations
Peter the Apostle - popes, fishermen, fishmongers, sailors, bakers, harvesters, butchers, glass makers, carpenters, shoemakers, clockmakers, blacksmiths, potters, masons, bridge builders, cloth makers
Peter of Alcantara - guards
Peter Celestine - bookbinders
Phocas the Gardener - farmers, farmhands, husbandry
Piran - Tinners, tin miners

Q.

Quentin - bombardiers, Catholic Chaplains, locksmiths, porters, tailors, and surgeons

R.

Raphael the Archangel - doctors, pharmacists, nurses, shepherds, matchmakers, travelers
Raymond Nonnatus - midwives, obstetricians
Raymond of Penyafort - medical record librarians, Canon lawyers
Rebekah - physicists
Regina - shepherdesses
John Regis - medical social workers
Reinold - Stonemasons
Roch - surgeons, tile-makers, second-hand dealers, gravediggers
Rose of Lima - embroiderers, gardeners

S.

Sebastian - soldiers, athletes
Severus of Avranches - silk and wool makers, drapers; milliners and hatters
Simon - tanners
Solange - shepherdesses
Stephen - bricklayers and masons, casketmakers, deacons, altar servers

T.

Tatiana of Rome - students
Thaddeus, Jude - difficult and impossible cases
Theobald of Provins - Farmers, winegrowers, shoemakers, beltmakers, charcoal-burners
Thérèse of Lisieux, the Little Flower - florists, Catholic Missionaries
Thomas - architects
Thomas Aquinas - students, teachers, academics, philosophers, theologians
Thomas Becket - secular clergy
Thomas More - politicians, statesmen, lawyers, civil servants, court clerks

U.

Urban of Langres - vine-growers, vine-dressers, gardeners, vintners, and coopers

V.

Valentine - beekeeping
Veronica - laundry workers; photographers[13]
Vincent of Saragossa - winemakers
Vincent de Paul - hospital workers
Vincent Ferrer - builders
Vitus - comedians, dancers

W.

Walstan - farmers, farmhands, husbandry
Winefride - payroll clerks
Winnoc - millers
Wolbodo - students
Wolfgang of Regensburg - woodworkers, woodcarvers

X.

Frances Xavier Cabrini - hospital administrators

Y.

Yves - lawyers

Z.

Zeno of Verona - fishermen
Zita - domestic servants, waiters
 

 



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